Family Liturgies

Family Liturgy: Parable of the Sower

tiny seed~by Jenn DiFrancesco

Prayer:

Dear God,

Be with us as we hear your word and help us to understand it.  Just as the sower in this story plants seed, plant your seed in our hearts and help our hearts to be like good soil.  Amen.

 

Scripture Text:  Matthew 13:1-9, 18-23

That day Jesus went out of the house and sat down beside the lake. Such large crowds gathered around him that he climbed into a boat and sat down. The whole crowd was standing on the shore.

 

He said many things to them in parables: “A farmer went out to scatter seed. As he was scattering seed, some fell on the path, and birds came and ate it. Other seed fell on rocky ground where the soil was shallow. They sprouted immediately because the soil wasn’t deep. But when the sun came up, it scorched the plants, and they dried up because they had no roots. Other seed fell among thorny plants. The thorny plants grew and choked them. Other seed fell on good soil and bore fruit, in one case a yield of one hundred to one, in another case a yield of sixty to one, and in another case a yield of thirty to one. Everyone who has ears should pay attention.”

 

“Consider then the parable of the farmer. Whenever people hear the word about the kingdom and don’t understand it, the evil one comes and carries off what was planted in their hearts. This is the seed that was sown on the path. As for the seed that was spread on rocky ground, this refers to people who hear the word and immediately receive it joyfully. Because they have no roots, they last for only a little while. When they experience distress or abuse because of the word, they immediately fall away. As for the seed that was spread among thorny plants, this refers to those who hear the word, but the worries of this life and the false appeal of wealth choke the word, and it bears no fruit. As for what was planted on good soil, this refers to those who hear and understand, and bear fruit and produce—in one case a yield of one hundred to one, in another case a yield of sixty to one, and in another case a yield of thirty to one.”

 

Creative Reading Idea:  

Read “The Tiny Seed” by Eric Carle

 

Prayer:

Dear God,

Be with us as we hear your word and help us to understand it.  Just as the sower in this story plants seed, plant your seed in our hearts and help our hearts to be like good soil.  Amen.

 

Thoughts:

Jesus often shared stories that we call parables.  Parables are simple, or perhaps not so simple stories that Jesus told to help people understand the important principals he wanted to share.  These everyday stories have deeper meanings which scholars today are still struggling to determine its meaning.

Most who read this parable focus on the types of soil that the seeds where the seeds are  scattered.  Another way to read this passage is to focus on the sower.  Most scholars agree that the sower in this passage is God.

 

Jump off Questions to Spark Conversation:

~If you were the sower, or a farmer, what type of seeds would you plant?  And where would you plant your seeds?

~If you had to re-tell the story today to your friends using a modern-day image, how would you tell it?

~If God is the sower in this story, how does this affect your view or understanding of God?

Spiritual Practice:  Seed Bombs

 

What you need:

Air Dry Red Clay

Wildflower Seeds

Compost Soil

Water

Instructions:

1- Mix two parts mixed seeds with three parts potting soil.

2- Stir in five parts of air dry red clay.

3- Moisten with water until mixture is damp enough to mold into balls.

4- Then take some of the mixture and roll it between the palms of your hands until it forms a tight ball.

5- Place the balls in the sun and allow to dry for 24-48 hours. Store in a cool, dry place until ready to use or share with friends.

6- Share your “Seed Bombs” with friends

 

*To use Seed Bombs, plant in soil and wait 2-3 weeks for the seeds to start sprouting

 

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